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HELVETICA

chimica acta

 

Instructions for Authors (2016, pdf)

General Policy

The journal Helvetica Chimica Acta (Helvetica) publishes original and significant contributions of fundamental research in all branches of experimental and theoretical chemistry. The key selection criteria are originality and quality of the work, as well as the breadth of interest to readers and subscribers.

Manuscripts should be submitted for publication as Articles. Review Articles will be considered for publication in Helvetica, too.

The manuscript should be submitted online via the online submission service Editorial Manager (https://www.editorialmanager.com/helvchimacta/default.aspx).

To submit your manuscript, please follow the instructions given on this website. Manuscripts must be formatted using the New Helvetica Templates (either double column layout Double-Column-Helvetica template or single column layout Single-Column-Helvetica template) as a single Microsoft Word file that contains the text, all figures and tables. Separate files containing Supporting Information associated with the manuscript should be uploaded separately.

Helvetica does not publish manuscripts that have already appeared in print or electronically (including those deposited in preprint archives). The author must inform the editor of manuscripts submitted, soon to be submitted, or in press at other journals that have a bearing on the manuscript being submitted to Helvetica. The Ethical Guidelines for Publication issued by the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences are followed and applied by the editors of Helvetica. Authors should reveal all sources of funding for the work presented in the manuscript and should declare any conflict of interest.

If the manuscript is a revised/extended version of a manuscript previously rejected by Helvetica, the author must inform the editor about the previous submission in the cover letter and explain in detail which changes have been made.

Submission of a manuscript implies that the authors agree to transfer copyright to the Wiley-VHCA AG  when the contribution is accepted for publication. A Copyright Transfer Agreement, detailing the rights granted to -Wiley-VHCA, must be signed within Wiley Author Services. If the contribution is not accepted for publication, this agreement shall be null and void. Publication cannot proceed without a signed copy of this agreement.

Preparation of Manuscripts

General Considerations. Manuscripts must be submitted in English. Careful preparation of the manuscript and adherence to the format and conventions of Helvetica as outlined in these Instructions for Authors is required. Manuscripts that are not well written or that do not adhere to the format and style of Helvetica will be rejected without further review.

A representative structural formula or scheme should be provided for the Table of Contents. The maximum available space for this graphical abstract is 7 × 16 cm.

Manuscripts should be kept to minimum length, and, for clarity, each work should be subdivided into labeled sections, e.g., Introduction, Results and Discussion, Conclusions, Experimental Part, Acknowledgement, Author Contribution, References

 

Special types of print should be used as follows:

Boldface: headings, designated numbers of chemical compounds.

Italic: subheadings, configurational prefixes ((R)-, (S)-, cis-, trans-, etc.), Latin words or abbreviations, trade names of chemical compounds (first letter should be capitalized), names of authors if mentioned in the text.

Small capital: symbols of molar and normal concentrations (m and n), d and l, the names of the discoverer in the nomenclature of genera, species, or varieties.

Boldface italic: the italicized terms and prefixes in headings.

 

Title.

a) The title of a manuscript, being of great importance for attracting readers’ interest and for information retrieval, should clearly and accurately provide information on the content and emphasis of the work. The use of abbreviations, symbols, chemical formulae, and references in a title is strongly discouraged. First letters of nouns and adjectives are capitalized.

b) The authors’ full first names, middle initials, and last names should be given, followed by the address(es) of the contributing laboratory or laboratories. The author to whom correspondence and/or inquiries should be directed should be indicated with an asterisk (*). Footnotes may be added to indicate the present mailing address(es) of the author(s). The corresponding author’s mailing address and e-mail address should also be included.

Abstract. The abstract should state briefly the purpose of the research, the principal results, and major conclusions; it should be self-explanatory and intelligible without reference to the text. For a typical contribution, an 800- to 1000-character abstract is usually adequate.

Keywords. Authors can ensure that a keyword search within Wiley Online Library (WOL) leads to a list that is as complete as possible of relevant publications in many Wiley-VCH journals (see the list at the start of the common keyword catalogue) by preferably using keywords from this catalogue. The catalogue is subdivided to facilitate the search for keywords but can also be completely searched. Some of the keywords are used in more than one area. As with all such records, a few guidelines facilitate its use, and these are briefly explained below: 1. At least two of the maximum of five keywords assigned to an article must come from this list. 2. Named reactions will be incorporated only in exceptional cases. Generally the reaction type is selected instead. For example, ‘cycloadditions’ instead of ‘Diels–Alder reactions’ and ‘rearrangement’ instead of ‘Claisen rearrangement’. 3. Heteroanalogues of compounds are mainly classified under the C variants, for example, (hetero)cumulenes, (hetero)dienes. A few aza and phospha derivatives are exceptions. 4. Compounds with inorganic components that are central to the article are listed under the element, for example, iron complexes under ‘iron’ and, if appropriate, the ligand type. Some group names such as ‘alkali metals’ exist alongside the names of important members of the group, for example, ‘lithium’. In such cases the group name is used for these members only when comparative studies are described. The members that do not appear separately are also categorized under the group name. 5. A keyword in the form ‘N ligand’ is only chosen if a considerable portion of the paper deals with the coordination of any ligand that coordinates through the atom concerned (in the example, nitrogen). 6. Spectroscopic methods are assigned as keywords only if the article is about the method itself or if the spectroscopic technique has made an important contribution to the problem under investigation. 7. ‘Structure elucidation’ is intended only if the crux of the paper is a structural elucidation or if a combination of several spectroscopic techniques were needed for conclusive solution of the structure. 8. An attempt has been made to avoid synonyms and to select more general concepts rather than specialized terms. Thus the term ‘double-decker complexes’ is excluded in favor of ‘sandwich complexes’. 9. Enzymes should be assigned to one of the six main enzyme classes (hydrolases, isomerases, ligases, lyases, oxidoreductases, transferases).

Introduction. The introduction should include relevant references.

Results and Discussion. The results and discussion may be combined or kept separate and may be further divided by subheadings. This section should not be cluttered with technical details. Abbreviations and acronyms should be used sparingly and consistently. Where they first appear in the text, they should – apart from the most common ones, such as IR, UV, and NMR – be defined; you may prefer to explain large numbers of abbreviations and acronyms in a footnote on the first page.

Experimental Part. The Experimental Part should only contain the most essential parts of your experimental procedures; the rest should be reported into the Supporting Information. Taken together, the experimental data in the main manuscript and the Supporting Information should be given in sufficient detail to enable others to repeat your work. In theoretical papers, technical details such as computational methods should likewise be confined to an appropriately named section.

Equipment and conditions used for the measurement of physical data should be described at the beginning of the Experimental Part in the General Section. Quantities of reactants, solvents, etc. should be included in parentheses (e.g., triphenylstannyl chloride (0.964 g, 2.5 mmol) in toluene (20 ml)) rather than in the running text. Physical data should be quoted with decimal points and negative exponents (e.g., 25.8 JK−1mol−1). The identity of all new compounds must be fully characterized by appropriate analytical methods (e.g., NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystal structure analysis, elemental analysis). The purity of all new compounds should be verified by elemental analysis, to an accuracy of within ±0.4%. In special cases, for instance, when the compound is unstable or not available in sufficient quantities for complete analysis, the exact relative molecular mass obtained from a high-resolution mass spectrum (HR-MS) and a clean 13C-NMR spectrum (as Supporting Information for inspection by the referees) should be supplied. These data should be given in the Supporting Information in the event that they exceed the scope of the Experimental Part.

Detailed presentation of physical data: Rf = 0.38 (CHCl3/MeOH 9:1). M.p. 20 – 21°C. [α]D20 = −13.5 (c = 0.2, acetone). UV (MeOH): 320 (5000). IR (KBr): 1780, 1790 (C=O). 1H-NMR (400 MHz, (D8)THF): 2.41 – 2.32 (m, H–C(5)); 1.33 (q, 3J(H,H) = 8.0, CH2); 0.92 (t, 3J(H,H) = 8.1, Me). 13C-NMR (100 MHz, CDCl3): 72.5 (d, CCH); 26.8 (s, Me); 6.5 (d, 1J(C,P) = 156.9, CHP). HR-MS: 315.1495 ([M + H]+, C21H19N2O+; calc. 315.1497). Anal. calc. for C12H10BrNOS (296.18): C 48.66, H 3.40, N 4.73; found: C 48.41, H 3.22, N 4.82. Please give data in this order.

Acknowledgements should be brief. A person can be thanked for assistance or for comments. Acknowledgements can contain grant and contribution numbers.

Author Contribution Statement. Authors are required to include a statement of responsibility in the manuscript that specifies the contribution of every author.

References. The list of references should be numbered sequentially in the order they are cited in the text. The numbers should be set in brackets, thus [2] or [3][14]. References are to be collected in numerical order at the end of the main text. Titles of journals must be abbreviated according to Chemical Abstracts (cf. Chemical Abstracts Service Source Index (CASSI) and Appendix I). After the authors’ names, the title of the article should follow. Then, the journal title (in italics) should be followed (no comma) by the year of publication (in boldface), comma, volume number (in italics), comma, first page till last page, period (or a semicolon within a composite reference).

Attention is drawn to the following conventions: a) Names of all authors of cited publications should be given. Use of ‘et al.’ in the list of references is not accepted. b) Only the initials of first and middle names should be given. c) The name of the journal and volume number cited should be given in italics.[1] d) Composite references may be used, instead of a series of individual ones.[2] The use of the Latin terms ibid. and idem is no longer allowed, since these are not compatible with electronic information-retrieval systems.[3] When a part of a composite reference is cited individually in the text, the parts of the composite reference may be specified by a), b), etc.[4a][4b] e) In references described as ‘personal communications’, an affiliation should follow the name(s) of the person(s) cited.[5] f) The full page range should be specified.

Examples of references to book chapters,[6] books,[7] patents,[8] computer programs,[9] and Ph.D. theses[10] are also given.

For users of ENDNOTE, please download the ENDNOTE STYLE-File and put it in your Styles' directory on your computer.

References

  [1]  J. A. Bodkin, M. D. McLeod, ‘The Sharpless asymmetric aminohydroxylation’, J. Chem. Soc., Perkins Trans. 1 2002, 2733 – 2746.

  [2]  S. R. Wilson, Y. Wu, ‘Crown ether fulleroids and their detection in solution by electrospray MS’, J. Chem. Soc., Chem. Commun. 1993, 784 – 786; F. Arias, Q. Yie, L. Echegoyen, Y. Wu, Q. Lu, S. R. Wilson, ‘Kinetic Effects in the Electrochemistry of Fullerene Derivatives at Very Negative Potentials’, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1994, 116, 6388 – 6394.

  [3]  J. Zimmermann, H. Voss, S. Wiemann, H. Erfle, T. Rupp, N. A. Hewitt, C. Schwager, J. Stegemann, W. Ansorge, ‘Cycle Sequencing protocol with Fluorescein-12-dCTP’, Methods Mol. Cell Biol. 1993, 4, 27 – 28; J. Zimmermann, H. Voss, H. Erfle, T. Rupp, T. Dietrich, N. A. Hewitt, C. Schwager, J. Stegemann, W. Ansorge, ‘Direct Sequencing of PCR Products using Magnetic Beads and Fluorescein-12-dUTP’, Methods Mol. Cell Biol. 1993, 3, 114 – 115.

  [4]  a) J.-P. Bourgeois, F. Diederich, L. Echegoyen, J.-F. Nierengarten, ‘Synthesis, and Optical and Electrochemical Properties of Cyclophane-Type Molecular Dyads Containing a Porphyrin in Close, Tangential Orientation Relative to the Surface of trans-1 Functionalized C60’, Helv. Chim. Acta 1998, 81, 1835 – 1844; b) E. Dietel, A. Hirsch, E. Eichhorn, A. Rieker, S. Hackbarth, B. Röder, ‘A macrocyclic [60]fullerene–porphyrin dyad involving π–π stacking interactions’, Chem. Commun. 1998, 1981 – 1982.

  [5]  H. Vančik (Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Zagreb), personal communication.

  [6]  H. A. Krassig, in ‘Cellulose Structure, Accessibility and Reactivity’, Ed. M. B. Huglin, Gordon and Breach Science Publishers, Yverdon, 1992, Vol. 11, p. 6.

  [7]  J. D. Dunitz, ‘X-Ray Analysis and the Structure of Organic Molecules’, Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta, Basel, and VCH, Weinheim, 1995.

  [8]  T. Kamata, N. Wasada, Jap. Pat. 2-204469, 1990, p. 381 – 384.

  [9]  G. M. Sheldrick, SHELXL97, Program for the Refinement of Crystal Structures, University of Göttingen, Germany, 1997.

  [10] B. R. Peterson, Ph.D. Thesis, University of California at Los Angeles, 1994.

 

In the text, reference to author(s) of cited works should be made without giving initials, e. g., ‘... as shown by Kamata and Wasada [8]’. If the reference carries the names of three or more authors it should be quoted as ‘Barbero et al.[1]’, if Barbero is the first author, or as ‘Piscopo and coworkers[1]’, if Piscopo is the senior author.

Please double-check your references, for example by using CrossRef, to ensure correct (online) links.

Footnotes. Footnotes, i.e., explanations or comments on the text, should be kept to a minimum. Each one should be indicated in the manuscript by a superscripted number, e. g., ‘... is implied1, otherwise...’, and numbered sequentially throughout the manuscript. Each footnote at the bottom of the page of the manuscript in which it is first mentioned. Footnotes must not be included with the references.

Tables. Tables are edited in the text and therefore should not be sent as graphical elements. They should be set up using the table tools of Word. Tables should be used to ensure clear, concise presentation of data should only be subdivided by three horizontal lines (head rule, neck rule, foot rule). Each table must be referred to in the text, given suitable captions, typed on separate sheets, and placed after the references. Column headings should be as short as possible but must define units unambiguously. When necessary, an abbreviated or symbolic column heading should be used and explained in the table heading or in a footnote. Footnotes to tables should be labeled a, b, c, etc., and typed at the bottom of the table.

Illustrations. Illustrations (structural formulae, figures, schemes) should, if possible, be designed for reduction to a one-column format (8.5 cm wide). The maximum width is the two-column format (17.5 cm wide). For optimum reproduction, illustrations should be larger than the desired final size. We recommend: font for script, Arial; size of lettering, 3–3.5 mm; total maximum width, 14 cm (or 28 cm for two-column width) for 60% reduction. Preferred graphics programs are ChemDraw, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop, restricted use holds for PowerPoint, Adobe Acrobat, and Microsoft Word, unusable are ChemWindows, C-Design, Origin, and MacDraw Pro. Acceptable formats within all graphics programs are JPG, TIFF, and EPS. The quality of the graphical material is of particular importance: low-resolution JPEG and GIF files are not suitable. The resolution for stick diagrams in a bitmap format (*.bmp files) must be at least 1000 dpi. The resolution for raster figures (e.g. ORTEP representations with shading) and for color figures must be at least 300 dpi. The colors for color pictures must be defined with the CMYK system (do not use the RGB color system, which is common in Windows).

Please also refer to our style files and templates (ChemDraw template) available at http://www.helvchimacta.ch/chemicaldrawing.htm.

Good-quality representations of graphical material are a prerequisite for publication in Helvetica. Please consult the IUPAC Recommendations on Graphical Representation of Stereochemical Configuration and Standards for Chemical Structure Diagrams (see J. Brecher, Pure Appl. Chem. 2008, 80, 277). Italicize symbols of physical quantities, but not their units (e.g., T for temperature, in contrast to T for the unit Tesla, but K as unit; J, but Hz; a, but nm), stereochemical information (cis, Z, R, etc.), locants (N-methyl, tert-butyl) and symmetry (C2v). Chemical formulae should be numbered with boldface Arabic numerals (e.g., 1). Labels of axes are to be separated from their units by a slash (e.g., T/K) and the upper and right-hand lines joining the axes are to be removed. Abbreviations such as Me, Et, Bu, iPr, tBu and Ph (not φ) may be used in formulae. General substituents should be indicated by R1, R2 (not R2, which means 2 R) or R, R′ (not R′). The spatial arrangement of the substituents should be indicated by hatched lines and solid wedges. A minus sign must be as long as the crossbar of a plus sign. Microscopy images (optical, electron, or scanning probe) should always contain a scale bar.

Nomenclature. All new compounds should be named in accordance with the rules and recommendations of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), the International Union of Biochemistry (IUB), and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) (cf. Appendix II). As an additional guideline, the Index Guide of Chemical Abstracts should be consulted. The use of ACD/Name (version 2015) is recommended.

For common solvents, reagents, or other compounds, the molecular formulae or accepted abbreviations maybe used: e.g., CHCl3, NaCl, SOCl2, MeOH, DMF, DMSO, THF, Py. An ad hoc abbreviation may be used for a name or formula that occurs repeatedly. This has to be clearly defined, e.g., tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

Different alkyl or arylalkyl radicals should be designated with superscripted numbers: R1, R2, R3, etc. (Subscripts are used only to denote stoichiometry.) Aryl radicals should be designated by Ar1, Ar2, etc., all others by X, Y, etc. (e. g., X = O, Y = NH2, Z = Br).

Individual atoms should be referred to as C(2), N(5) (not C-2 and N-5), etc. For ‘hydrogen atom attached to carbon atom 4’, etc., Helvetica prefers the notation H–C(4).

Units and Their Symbols

SI Units are to be used, especially in contributions dealing with physical chemistry. Significant figures should be respected. However, some non-SI units listed in Appendix IV are acceptable.

Crystal-Structure Analysis

Authors must deposit their data before submitting their manuscripts or update data already available, so that referees can retrieve the information directly from the database. Please use the free online Checkcif service provided by the International Union of Crystallography and submit the Checkcif report along with your manuscript. Please ensure that the data deposited with the database are identical to those in the manuscript.

Crystallographic data should not be sent as Supporting Information but should be deposited with either the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre for organic and organometallic compounds or with the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe for inorganic compounds, elements, metals, and minerals.

If a crystal structure analysis is not an essential part of the paper, only a footnote is required indicating where the detailed results can be found. Otherwise, the following data should be given in the manuscript: crystal dimensions, crystal system, space group, unit cell dimensions and volume, ρcalcd, 2θmax, radiation, wavelength, scan mode, temperature of measurement, no. of measured and independent reflections, no. of reflections included in refinement, σ limits, whether and how Lorentzian polarization and absorption corrections were performed (μ, min/max transmission), method of structure solution and program, method of refinement and program, no. of parameters, treatment of H atoms. R, wR, whether refined against |F| or |F2|, residual electron density, and the database in which the detailed results are deposited. An ORTEP-type plot will not be reproduced when it merely serves to confirm the structure of a synthetic intermediate.

For organic and organometallic compounds: Send your data including author and journal details in CIF format to the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC, 12 Union Road, Cambridge CB2 1EZ (UK); tel: (+44)1223-336-408; fax: (+44)1223-336-033; e-mail: deposit@ccdc.cam.ac.uk; see also www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk/conts/depositing.html). The data will be assigned a registry number, which should be included with the following standard text in the manuscript: ‘CCDC-… contain(s) the supplementary crystallographic data for this work. These data can be obtained free of charge from The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre via www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk/data_request/cif.’

For inorganic compounds: The Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe only accepts data deposited in electronic form (in CIF format). Send the data by e-mail (or on disk) to FIZ, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); tel: (+49)7247-808-205; fax: (+49)7247-808-666; e-mail: crysdata@fiz-karlsruhe.de; www.fiz-karlsruhe.de under ‘Products’. You will be given a CSD number, which should be included with the following standard text in the manuscript: ‘Further details of the crystal structure investigation(s) can be obtained from the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany (fax: (+49)7247-808-666; e-mail: crysdata@fiz-karlsruhe.de) on quoting the depository number CSD-. . .’

For proteins: Protein Data Bank (www.rcsb.org/pdb/home/home.do).

Supporting Information. All material that is intended to be published only online as Supporting Information should be presented succinctly (in English). This material undergoes the peer review process and must therefore be included with the original submission. The author bears full responsibility for the content of the Supporting Information. Color and animated multimedia applications are welcome and published online at no cost to the author or reader. Please refer to such applications in the article itself where appropriate (see the Supporting Information).

In addition, the standard text:

Supporting information for this article is available on the WWW under http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hlca.2016xxxxx should be added as a footnote after the addresses. Supporting Information should not include crystallographic data that are available from CCDC or FIZ.

To submit multimedia files that exceed 5 MB in size, please save them on your web server, but do not link to them. Send us the URL so we can download the files and make them available to referees and, if accepted, to readers. Please use suitable compression technology to avoid exceedingly large movie files (>10 MB) for the benefit of referees’ and readers’ bandwidth and storage capacity. Also, please make sure that your movies are saved in a common format (such as MPEG, AVI, QuickTime, GIF) that can be played on at least two different computer platforms (out of Windows/MacOS/Linux). Smaller files can simply be uploaded via the Editorial Manager.

Proofs and Corrections

The corresponding authors will be provided with PDFs of the galley proof via e-mail. Amendments and/or additions must be returned to the editor within seven days upon receipt of the e-mail. The author is solely responsible for checking the proofs.

 


 

Appendix I. Selected Journal Abbreviations

A

Acc. Chem. Res.

Acta Chem. Scand., Ser. A/B

Acta Crystallogr., Sect. A/B/C/D/E/F

Adv. Mass Spectrom.

Adv. X-Ray Anal.

Agric. Biol. Chem.

Anal. Biochem.

Anal. Chem.

Anal. Chim. Acta

Angew. Chem.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.

Angew. Makromol. Chem.

Ann. Chim. (Cachan, Fr.)

Ann. Chim. (Rome)

Arzneim.-Forsch.

Aust. J. Chem.

B

Ber. Bunsenges. Phys. Chem.

Ber. Dtsch. Chem. Ges.

Biochemistry

Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.

Biochem. J.

Biochem. Pharmacol.

Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn.

Bull. Soc. Chim. Belg.

Bull. Soc. Chim. Fr.

C

Can. J. Biochem.

Can. J. Chem.

Carbohydr. Res.

Chem. Abstr.

Chem. Ber.

Chem. Biodiversity

Chem. Commun. (Cambridge, UK)

Chem. Eng. News

Chem. Eng. Sci.

Chem. Eng. (N.Y.)

Chem. Eur. J.

Chem. Ind. (London)

Chem. Lett.

Chem. Pharm. Bull.

Chem. Phys.

Chem. Phys. Lett.

Chem. Rev. (Washington, DC, U.S.)

Chem. Soc. Rev.

Chimia

Collect. Czech. Chem. Commun.

C. R. Acad. Sci., Ser. II/III

D

Dalton Trans.

Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR

E

Electrochim. Acta

Eur. J. Biochem.

Eur. J. Inorg. Chem.

Eur. J. Org. Chem.

Eur. J. Pharmacol.

Experientia

F

Faraday Trans.

Fresenius’ J. Anal. Chem.

G

Gazz. Chim. Ital.

H

Helv. Chim. Acta

Heterocycles

I

Indian J. Chem., Sect. A/B

Inorg. Chem.

Inorg. Chim. Acta

Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Lett.

Int. J. Biochem.

Int. J. Chem. Kinet.

Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Phys.

Int. J. Pept. Protein Res.

Int. J. Quantum Chem.

Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. Khim.

J

J. Am. Chem. Soc.

J. Antibiot.

J. Appl. Chem. Biotechnol.

J. Appl. Crystallogr.

J. Appl. Electrochem.

J. Biochem.

J. Biol. Chem.

J. Chem. Educ.

J. Chem. Phys.

J. Chem. Thermodyn.

J. Chromatogr.

J. Chromatogr. Sci.

J. Electrochem. Soc.

J. Electron Spectrosc. Relat. Phenom.

J. Fluorine Chem.

J. Heterocycl. Chem.

J. Lipid Res.

J. Liq. Chromatogr.

J. Magn. Reson.

J. Med. Chem.

J. Mol. Spectrosc.

J. Nat. Prod.

J. Organomet. Chem.

J. Org. Chem.

J. Pharm. Pharmacol.

J. Pharm. Sci.

J. Photochem.

J. Phys. Chem. A/B/C

J. Prakt. Chem.

J. Radioanal. Chem.

J. Solid State Chem.

J. Solution Chem.

J. Steroid Biochem.

Jpn. J. Antibiot.

Jpn. J. Pharmacol.

 

K

Khim. Prir. Soedin.

L

Liebigs Ann. Chem.

Lipids

M

Microchem. J.

Microchim. Acta

Mol. Pharmacol.

Mol. Phys.

Monatsh. Chem.

N

Nature (London)

Naturwissenschaften

Nouv. J. Chim.

Nucleic Acids Res.

O

Org. Magn. Reson.

Org. Mass Spectrom.

P

Perkin Trans. 1/2

Pharmacology

Pharmacol. Res. Commun.

Photochem. Photobiol.

Phytochemistry

Planta Med.

Polym. J. (Tokyo, Jpn.)

Pol. J. Chem.

Proc. Anal. Div. Chem. Soc.

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.

Pure Appl. Chem.

R

Radiat. Phys. Chem.

Recl. Trav. Chim. Pays-Bas

S

Science (Washington, DC, U.S.)

Spectrochim. Acta, Part A/B

Synthesis

Synth. Commun.

Synlett

T

Talanta

Tetrahedron

Tetrahedron Lett.

Theor. Chim. Acta

Top. Curr. Chem.

V

Vitamins

Y

Yakugaku Zasshi

Z

Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem.

Z. Kristallogr., Kristallogeom., Kristallphys., Kristallchem.

Z. Naturforsch., A/B/C

Z. Phys. Chem. (Leipzig)

Z. Phys. Chem. (Wiesbaden)

Zh. Neorg. Khim.

Zh. Obshch. Khim.

Zh. Org. Khim.


 

Appendix II. IUPAC Recommendations on Nomenclature, Symbols, and Terminology

I. Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry

 1. ‘Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry, Sections A, B, C, D, E, F, and H; 1979 Edition’ (The ‘Blue Book’), IUPAC, Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1979.

 2. ‘A Guide to IUPAC Nomenclature of Organic Compounds, Recommendations 1993’, Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford – London – Edinburgh – Boston – Melbourne – Paris – Berlin – Vienna.

 3. ‘Extension of Rules A-1.1 and A-2.5 Concerning Numerical Terms Used in Organic Chemical Nomenclature (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1983, 55, 1463.

 4. ‘Revision of the Extended Hantzsch-Widman System of Nomenclature for Heteromonocycles’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1983, 55, 409.

 5. ‘Treatment of Variable Valence in Organic Nomenclature (Lambda Conventions) (Recommendations 1983)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1984, 56, 769.

 6. ‘Glossary of Terms Used in Physical Organic Chemistry’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1983, 55, 1281.

 7. ‘Nomenclature for Straightforward Transformations (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1981, 53, 305.

 8. ‘Extension of Rules A-1.1 and A-2.5 Concerning Numerical Terms Used in Organic Chemical Nomenclature’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1986, 58, 1693.

 9. ‘Glossary of Terms Used in Photochemistry (Recommendations 1988)’, Pure. Appl. Chem. 1988, 60, 1055.

10. ‘Names for Hydrogen Atoms, Ions, and Groups, and Reactions Involving Them (Recommendations 1988)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1988, 60, 1115.

11. ‘Nomenclature for Cyclic Organic Compounds with Contiguous Formal Double Bonds (the δ-Convention) (Recommendations 1988)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1988, 60, 1395.

12. ‘System for Symbolic Respresentation of Reaction Mechanisms (Recommendations 1988)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1989, 61, 23.

13. ‘Nomenclature for Organic Chemical Transformations (Recommendations 1988)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1989, 61, 725.

14. ‘Biotransformation – a Useful Tool in Organic Chemistry’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1990, 62, 753.

15. ‘Revised Nomenclature for Radicals, Ions, Radical Ions, and Related Species (Recommendations 1993)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1993, 65, 1357.

16. ‘Glossary of Terms Used in Physical Organic Chemistry (Recommendations 1994)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1994, 66, 1077.

17. ‘Glossary of Class Names of Organic Compounds and Reactive Intermediates Based on Structure (Recommendations 1995)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1995, 67, 1307.

18. ‘Basic Terminology of Stereochemistry (IUPAC Recommendations 1996)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1996, 68, 2193.

19. ‘Nomenclature and Terminology of Fullerenes: A Preliminary Survey’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1997, 69, 1411.

20. ‘Nomenclature of Fused and Bridged Fused Ring Systems (Recommendations 1998)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1998, 70, 144.

21. ‘Extension and Revision of the von Baeyer System for Naming Polycyclic Compounds (Including Bicyclic Compounds) ( Recommendations 1999)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1999, 71, 513.

22. ‘Extension and Revision of the Nomenclature for Spiro Compounds (Recommendations 1999)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1999, 71, 531.

23. ‘Revised Section F: Natural Products and Related Compounds (Recommendations 1999)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1999, 71, 587.

24. ‘Corrections to A Guide to IUPAC Nomenclature of Organic Compounds (Recommendations 1993)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1999, 71, 1327.

25. ‘Glossary of Terms Used in Theoretical Organic Chemistry (Recommendations 1999)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1999, 71, 1919.

26. ‘Nomenclature for the C60-Ih and C70-D5h(6) Fullerenes (Recommendations 2002)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2002, 74, 629.

27. ‘Phane Nomenclature. Part I: Phane Parent Names (Recommendations 1998)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1998, 70, 1513.

28. ‘Phane Nomenclature. Part II: Modification of the Degree of Hydrogenation and Substitution Derivatives of Phane Parent Hydrides (Recommendations 2002)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2002, 74, 809.

29. ‘Errata. Revised Section F: Natural Products and Related Compounds (Recommendations 1999). Corrections and Modifications (2004)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2004, 76, 1283

30. ‘Numbering of Fullerenes (Recommendations 2004)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2005, 77, 801.

31. ‘Rules for Abbreviation of Protecting Groups (IUPAC Technical Report)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2013, 85, 307.

 

II. Biochemical Nomenclature

1. ‘Biochemical Nomenclature and Related Documents’; A Compendium, 2nd Edition, International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Portland Press, London – Chapel Hill, 1992.

 2. ‘Nomenclature and Symbolism for Amino Acids Peptides (Recommendations 1983)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1984, 56, 595.

 3. ‘Abbreviated Nomenclature of Synthetic Polypeptides (Polymerized Amino Acids)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1973, 33, 437

 4. ‘Abbreviations and Symbols for Description of Conformation of Polypeptide Chains (Rules Approved 1974)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1974, 40, 291.

 5. ‘Nomenclature of Carbohydrates (Recommendations 1996)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1996, 82, 1919.

 6. ‘Nomenclature of Unsaturated Monosaccharides (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 54, 207.

 7. ‘Nomenclature of Branched-Chain Monosaccharides (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 54, 211.

 8. ‘Conformational Nomenclature for Five- and Six-Membered Ring Formes of Monosaccharides and their Derivatives (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 53, 1901.

 9. ‘Polysaccharide Nomenclature (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 54, 1517.

10. ‘Abbreviated Terminology of Oligosaccharide Chains (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 54, 1517.

11. ‘Symbols for Specifying the Conformation of Polysaccharide Chains (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1983, 55, 1269.

12. ‘Nomenclature of Cyclitols’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1974, 37, 283.

13. ‘Abbreviations and Symbols for Nucleic Acids, Polynucleotides, and their Constituents (Rules Approved 1974)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1974, 40, 277.

14. ‘Abbreviations and Symbols for the Description of Conformations Polynucleotide Chains (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1983, 55, 1296.

15. ‘Nomenclature of Tetrapyrroles (Recommendations 1986)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1987, 59, 779.

16. ‘Nomenclature of Corrinoids’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1976, 48, 459.

17. ‘Nomenclature of Steroids (Recommendations 1989)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1989, 61, 1783.

18. ‘Nomenclature of Carotenoids (Rules Approved 1974)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1975, 41, 405.

19. ‘Nomenclature of Retinoids (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1983, 55, 721.

20. ‘Nomenclature of Tocopherols and Related Compounds’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 54, 1507.

21. ‘Nomenclature of Vitamin D (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 54, 1511.

22. ‘Nomenclature of Quinones with Isoprenoid Side-Chains (Rules 1973)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1974, 38, 439.

23. ‘Definitive Nomenclature for Vitamin B-6 and Related Compounds’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1973, 33, 445.

24. ‘Nomenclature of Iron-Sulfur Proteins (Recommendations 1978)’, Eur. J. Biochem. 1979, 93, 427; Corrections, ibid. 1979, 95, 369 and 102, 315.

25. ‘Enzyme Nomenclature Recommendations 1978’, Academic Press, New York, 1979; ‘Supplement 1. Corrections and Additions’, Eur. J. Biochem. 1980, 104, 1; ‘Suppelment 2. Corrections and Additions’. Eur. J. Biochem. 1981, 116, 423.

26. ‘Multienzyme Proteins’, Trends Biochem. Sci. 1979, 4, N275.

27. ‘The Nomenclature of Multiple Forms of Enzymes (Recommentations 1976)’, Eur. J. Biochem. 1978, 82, 1.

28. ‘Generic Descriptors and Trivial Names for Vitamins and Related Compounds (Recommendations 1976)’ Nutrition Abstr. and Revs., Series A: Human and Experimental 1978, 48, 831.

29. ‘Nomenclature of Phosphorus-Containing Compounds of Biochemical Importance (Recommendations 1976)’, Eur. J. Biochem. 1977, 79, 1.

30. ‘Nomenclature of Peptide Hormones (Recommendations 1978)’, Biochemistry 1975, 14, 2559.

31. ‘The Nomenclature of Lipids (Recommendations 1976)’, Eur. J. Biochem. 1977, 79, 11.

32. ‘Nomenclatures and Symbols for Folic Acid and Related Compounds, Tentative Rules’, J. Biol. Chem. 1966, 241, 2991.

33. ‘Abbreviations and Symbols for Chemical Names of Special Interest in Biological Chemistry Revised Tentative Rules (1965)’, Biochemistry 1966, 5, 1445.

34. ‘Abbreviations and Symbols’. Eur. J. Biochem. 1977, 79, 11.

35. ‘List of Symbols with Units Recommended for Use in Biotechnology (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 54, 1743.

36. ‘Physicochemical Quantities and Units in Clinical Chemistry with Special Emphasis on Activities and Activity Coefficients (Recommendations 1986)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1984, 56, 567.

37. ‘Nomenclature of Prenols (Recommendations 1986)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1987, 59, 683.

38. ‘Nomenclature and Symbols for Folic Acid and Related Compounds (Recommendations 1986) Pure Appl. Chem. 1987, 59, 833.

39. ‘Nomenclature of Glycoproteins, Glycoproteins and Peptidoglycans Recommendations 1985)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1988, 60, 1389.

40. ‘Recommendations for Nomenclature and Tables in Biochemical Thermodynamics (Recommendations 1994)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1994, 66, 1641.

41. ‘Nomenclature of Lignans and Neolignans (Recommendations 2000)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2000, 72, 1493.

 

III. Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry, Analytical Nomenclature, and Electrochemistry

Inorganic Chemistry

 1. ‘Nomenclature or Inorganic Chemistry, Recommendations 1990’ (The ‘Red Book’), Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford – London – Edinburgh – Boston – Melbourne, 1990.

 2 ‘How to Name an Inorganic Substance. A Guide to the Use of Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry, 2nd ed., 1971’ Pergamom Press, New York, 1977.

 3. ‘Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry, II. 1. Isotopically Modified Compounds (Recommendations 1981)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1981, 53, 1887.

 4. ‘Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry, II. 2. The Nomenclature of Hydrides of Nitrogen and Derived Cations, Anions and Ligands’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 54, 2545.

 5. ‘Nomenclature of Inorganic Boron Compounds’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1972, 30, 681.

 6. ‘Recommendations for the Naming of Elements of Atomic Numbers Greater than 100’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1979, 51, 381.

 7. ‘Element by Element Review of their Atomic Weights.’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1984, 56, 695.

 8. ‘New Notations in the Periodic Table’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1988, 60, 431.

 9. ‘Atomic Weights of the Elements 1993’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1994, 66, 2423.

10. ‘Glossary of Terms Used in Bioinorganic Chemistry (Recommendations 1997)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1997, 69, 1251.

11. ‘Nomenclature of Inorganic Chains and Ring Compounds (Recommendation 1997)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1997, 69, 1659.

12. ‘Isotopic Composition of the Elements’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1998, 70, 217.

13. ‘Names for Inorganic Radicals (Recommendations 2000)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2000, 72, 473.

14. ‘Terminology for Compounds in the Si-Al-O-N System (Recommendations 1999)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1999, 71, 1765.

15. ‘Naming of new Elements (Recommendations 2002)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2002, 74, 787.

16. ‘Name and Symbol of the Element with Atomic Number 111 (Recommendations 2004)’, Pure Appl. Chem.2004, 76, 2101.

17. ‘Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry, IUPAC Recommendations 2005’, RSC Publishing, Cambridge, UK, 2005.

18. ‘Names and Symbols of the Elements with Atomic Numbers 114 and 116 (IUPAC Recommendations 2012)’, Pure Appl. Chem.2012, 84, 1669.

19. ‘Atomic Weights of the Elements 2011 (IUPAC Technical Report)’, Pure Appl. Chem.2013, 85, 1047.

20. ‘Terminology of Metal–Organic Frameworks and Coordination Polymers (IUPAC Recommendations 2013)’, Pure Appl. Chem.2013, 85, 1715.

 

 

Analytical Nomenclature

 1. ‘Compendium of Analytical Nomenclature (Definitive Rules 1977)’, IUPAC, Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1978.

 2. ‘Nomenclature for Thermal Analysis IV (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1981, 53, 1597.

 3. ‘Recommendations for Publishing Manuscripts on Ion-Selective Electrodes’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1981, 53, 1907.

 4. ‘Recommendation for Publication of Papers on Precipitation Methods of Gravimetric Analysis’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1981, 53, 2303.

 5. ‘Nomenclature for Thermal Analysis II and III’; Pure Appl. Chem. 1980, 52, 2385.

 6. ‘Recommended Nomenclature for Scales of Working in Analysis’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1979, 51, 43.

 7. ‘Guide to Trivial Names, Trade Names, and Synonyms for Substances Used in Analytical Nomenclature’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1978, 50, 339.

 8. ‘Recommendations on the Usage of the Terms ‘Equivalent’ and ‘Normal’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1978, 50, 325.

 9. ‘Recommendations for Nomenclature of Ion-Selective Electrodes’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1976, 48, 127.

10. ‘Proposed Terminology and Symbols for the Transfer of Solutes from One Solvent to Another’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1978, 50, 589.

11. ‘Recommended Nomenclature for Titrimetric Analysis’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1969, 18, 427.

12. ‘Recommendations for the Presentation of the Results of Chemical Analysis’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1969, 18, 437.

13. ‘Recommended Symbols for Solution Equilibria’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1969, 18, 457.

14. ‘Recommended Nomenclature for Liquid-Liquid Distribution’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1970, 21, 109.

15. ‘Recommended Nomenclature for Automatic Analysis’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1970, 21, 527.

16. ‘Recommendations on Ion-Exchange Nomenclature’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1972, 29, 617.

17. ‘Nomenclature for Chromatography (Recommendations 1993)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1993, 65, 819.

18. ‘Recommendations on Nomenclature for Contamination Phenomena in Precipitation from Aqueous Solutions’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1974, 37, 463.

19. ‘Recommendations on Nomenclature for Thermal Analysis (Rules 1972)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1974, 37, 439.

20. ‘Recommendations for the Usage of Selective, Selectivity, and Related Terms in Analytical Chemistry’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1984, 55, 553.

21. ‘Recommendations on the Use of the Term Amplification Reactions’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 54, 2553.

22. ‘Recommendations for Publication of Papers on a New Analytical Method Based on Ion Exchange or Ion-Exchange Chromatography’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1980, 52, 2553.

23. ‘Recommendations for Presentation of Data on Compleximetric Indicators, I. General’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1979, 51, 1357.

24. ‘Glossary of Terms Used in Nuclear Analytical Chemistry (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 54, 1533.

25. ‘Nomenclature, Symbols, and Units Recommended for in-situ Microanalysis (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1983, 55, 2023.

26. ‘General Aspects of Trace Analytical Methods. IV. Recommendations for Nomenclature, Standard Procedures, and Reporting of Experimental Data for Surface Analysis Techniques’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1979, 51, 2243.

27. ‘Definition of pH Scales, Standard References Values, Measurement of pH and Related Technology (Recommendations 1984)’, 1985, 57, 531.

28. ‘Thermodynamic Functions of Transfer of Singles Ions from Water to Nonaqueous and Mixed Solvents. Part 2. Enthalpies and Entropies of Transfer to Nonaqueous Solvents’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1985, 57, 1103.

29. ‘Thermodynamic Functions of Transfer of Single Ions from Water to Nonaqueous and Mixed Solvents. Part 3. Standard Potentials of Selected Electrodes’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1985, 57, 1129.

30. ‘Definition and Determination of Response Time of Ion Selective Electrodes’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1986, 58, 469.

31. ‘Characteristics of Liquid Stationary Phases and Column Evaluation for Gas Chromatography’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1986, 58, 1291.

32. ‘Nomenclature for Automated and Mechanised Analysis (Recommandations 1989)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1989, 61, 1657.

33. ‘Recommended Methods for the Purification of Solvents and Tests for Impurities: 1-Propanol, 2-Propanol, and 2-Methyl-2-propanol’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1986, 58, 1411.

34. ‘Recommended Methods for Purification of Solvents and Tests for Impurities: Acetone’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1986, 58, 1535.

35. ‘Recommended Methods for Purification of Solvents and Tests for Impurities: Nitromethane’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1986, 58, 1541.

36. ‘Reference Materials for Fluorescence Measurements’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1988, 60, 1107.

37. ‘Molecular Absorption Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet and Visible (UV/VIS) (Recommendations 1988)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1988, 60, 1449.

38. ‘Nomenclature for Sampling and Analytical Chemistry (Recommendations 1990)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1990, 62, 1193.

39. ‘Gibbs Energies of Transfer into Aqueous Alcohols’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1990, 62, 899.

40. ‘Total Half-lives for Selected Nuclides’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1990, 62, 941.

41. ‘Nomenclature of Kinetic Methods of Analysis (Recommendations 1993)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1993, 65, 2291.

42. ‘Nomenclature in Evaluation of Analytical Methods Including Detection and Quantification Capabilities (Recommendations 1995)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1995, 67, 1699.

43. ‘Nomenclature of Non-linear Chromatography (Recommendations 1996)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1996, 82, 1591.

44. ‘Selectivity in Analytical Chemistry (Recommendations 2001)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2001, 73, 1381.

45. ‘Glossary of Terms Related to Solubility (IUPAC Recommendations 2008)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2008, 80, 233.

 

Electrochemistry

 1. ‘Eletrochemical Nomenclature’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1974, 37, 499.

 2. ‘Recommendations on Reporting Electrode Potentials in Nonaqueous Solvents (Recommendations 1983)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1984, 56, 461.

 3. ‘Nomenclature for Transport Phenomena in Electrolytic Systems’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1981, 53, 1827.

 4. ‘Electrode Reaction Orders, Transfer Coefficients, and Rate Constants. Amplification of Definitions and Recommendations for Publication of Parameters’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1980, 52, 233.

 5. ‘Classification and Nomenclature of Electroanalytical Techniques’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1976, 45, 81.

 6. ‘Recommendations for Sign Conventions and Plotting of Electrochemical Data’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1976, 45, 131.

 7. ‘Recommended Terms, Symbols, and Definitions for Electroanalytical Chemistry (Recommendations 1985)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1985, 57, 1491.

 8. ‘Proposed Terminology and Symbols for the Quantity Representing the Transfer of Solutes from One Solvent to Another’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1978, 50, 587.

 9. ‘Standard Potentials of Amalgam Electrodes in Aqueuos Solutions, Temperature Coefficients and Activity Coefficients of Metals in Mercury’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1985, 57, 169.

10. ‘Interphases in Systems of Conducting Phases (Recommendations 1985)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1986, 58, 437.

11. ‘The Absolute Electrode Potential: An Explanatory Note (Recommendations 1986)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1986, 58, 955.

12. ‘Electrochemical Corrosion Nomenclature (Recommendations 1988)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1989, 61, 19.

13. ‘Terminology in Semiconductor Electrochemistry and Photoelectrochemical Energy Conversion (Recommandation 1991)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1991, 63, 569.

14. ‘Terminology and Notations for Multistep Electrochemical Reaction Mechanisms (Recommendations 1994)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1994, 66, 2445.

15. ‘Recommendations for Nomenclature of Ion-Selective Electrodes (Recommendations 1994)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1994, 66, 2527.

 

IV. Physical Chemistry

 1. ‘Manual of Symbols and Terminology for Physicochemical Quantities and Units (1979 Edition)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1979, 51, 1.

 2. ‘Manual of Symbols and Terminology for Physicochemical Quantities and Units. Appendix IV. Notation of States and Processes, Significance of the ‘Standard’ in Chemical Thermodynamics’, and Remarks on Commonly Tabulated Forms of Thermodynamic Functions’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 54, 1239.

 3. ‘A Guide to Procedures for the Publication of Thermodynamic Data’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1972, 29, 395.

 4. ‘Assignment and Presentation of Uncertainties of Numerical Results of Thermodynamic Measurements (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1981, 53, 1805.

 5. ‘Calorimetric Measurements on Cellular Systems: Recommendations for Measurements and Presentation of Results (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 54, 671.

 6. ‘Manual of Symbols and Terminology for Physicochemical Quantities and Units. Appendix I. Definition of Activities and Related Quantities’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1979, 51, 37.

 7. ‘Manual of Symbols and Terminology for Physicochemical Quantities and Units. Appendix V. Symbolism and Terminology in Chemical Kinetics (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1981, 53, 753.

 8. ‘Manual of Symbols and Terminology for Physicochemical Quantities and Units. Appendix II. Definitions, Terminology, and Symbols in Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Part I’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1972, 31, 577; Part II. Heterogeneous Catalysis (Rules Approved 1975)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1976, 46, 71.

 9. ‘Definitions, Terminology, and Symbols in Colloid and Surface Chemistry. Part 1.14: Light Scattering (Provisional),’ Pure Appl. Chem. 1983, 55, 931.

10. ‘Reporting Experimental Pressure-Area Data with Film Balances (Recommendations 1984)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1985, 57, 621.

11. ‘Reporting Physisorption Data for Gas/Solid Systems with Special Reference to the Determination of Surface Area and Porosity (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1982, 54, 2201.

12. ‘Reporting Experimental Data Dealing with Critical Micellization Concentrations (c.m.c.’s) of Aqueous Surfactant Systems’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1979, 51, 1083.

13. ‘Chemical Nomenclature and Formulation of Compositions and Synthetic and Natural Zeolites’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1979, 51, 1091.

14. ‘Manual of Symbols and Terminology Physicochemical Quantities and Units. Appendix II. Definitions, Terminology, and Symbols in Colloid and Surface Chemistry. Part 1.13. Selected Definitions, Terminology, and Symbols for Rheological Properties’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1979, 51, 1213.

15. ‘Expression of Results in Quantum Chemistry’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1978, 50, 77.

16. ‘Recommended Standards for Reporting Photochemical Data (Recommendations 1983)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1984, 56, 939.

17. ‘Test Data for Normal Coordinate Calculations’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1985, 57, 121.

18. ‘Reporting Physisorption Data for Gas/Solid Systems with Special Reference to the Determination of Surface Area and Porosity (Recommendations 1984)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1985, 57, 603.

19. ‘Presentation of Molecular Parameter Values for Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy (Recommendations 1988)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1988, 60, 1385.

20. ‘Polarographic Half-Wave Potentials of Cations Nonaqueous Solvents’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1990, 62, 1839.

21. ‘A Glossary of Terms Used in Chemical Kinetics, Including Reactions Dynamics (Recommendations 1996)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1996, 82, 149.

22. ‘Acronyms Used in Theoretical Chemistry’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1996, 82, 387.

23. ‘Nomenclature of Structural and Compositional Characteristics of Orderd Microporous and Mesoporous Materials with Inorganic Hosts (Recommendations 2001)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2001, 73, 381.

24. ‘Definition of the Hydrogen Bond (IUPAC Recommendations 2011)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2011, 83, 1637.

25. ‘Definition of the Halogen Bond (IUPAC Recommendations 2013)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2013, 85, 1711.

 

 

V. Spectroscopy

 1. ‘Recommendations for the Presentation of NMR Data for Publication in Chemical Journals’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1972, 29, 625.

 2. ‘Presentation of NMR Data for Publication in Chemical Journals. B. Conventions Relating to Spectra from Nuclei Other than Protons’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1967, 45, 217.

 3. ‘Recommendations for Publication of Papers on Methods of Molecular Absorption Spectrophotometry in Solution in between 200 and 800 nm’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1978, 50, 237.

 4. ‘Recommendations for Nomenclature and Symbolism for Mass Spectroscopy (Recommendations 1991)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1991, 63, 1541.

 5. ‘Nomenclature and Conventions for Reporting Mössbauer Spectroscopy Data’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1976, 45, 221.

 6. ‘Nomenclature and Spectral Presentation in Electron Spectroscopy Resulting by Excitation by Photons’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1976, 45, 221.

 7. ‘Definitions and Symbolism of Molecular Constants’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1978, 50, 1707.

 8. ‘Nomenclature, Symbols, Units, and their Usage in Spectrochemical Analysis. Part I: General Atomic Emission Spectroscopy’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1972, 30, 651.

 9. ‘Nomenclature, Symbols, Units, and their Usage in Spectrochemical Analysis. Part II: Data Interpretation’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1976, 45, 99.

10. ‘Nomenclature, Symbols, Units, and their Usage in Spectrochemical Analysis. Part III: Analytical Flame Spectroscopy and Associated Non-Flame Procedures’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1976, 45, 105.

11. ‘Nomenclature, Symbols, Units, and their Usage in Spectrochemical Analysis. Part IV: Radiation Sources (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1981, 53, 1913.

12. ‘Nomenclature, Symbols, Units, and their Usage in Spectrochemical Analysis. Part V: Radiation Sources (Provisional)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1981, 53, 1913.

13. ‘Nomenclature, Symbols, Units, and their Usage in Spectrochemical Analysis. Part VI: Molecular Luminescence Spectroscopy’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1984, 56, 231.

14. ‘Names, Symbols, Definitions and Units of Quantities in Optical Spectroscopy (Recommendations 1984)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1985, 57, 105.

15. ‘Nomenclature, Symbols, Units, and their Usage in Spectrochemical Analysis – V. Radiation Sources (Recommendations 1985)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1985, 57, 1453.

16. ‘Quantitative Characterization of Procedures Using Ultraviolet and Visible Molecular Absorption Spectrophotometry’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1986, 58, 1015.

17. ‘Nomenclature System for X-Ray Spectroscopy (Recommendations 1991)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1991, 63, 735.

18. ‘English-Derived Abbreviations for Experimental Techniques in Surface Science and Chemical Spectroscopy (Recommendations 1991)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1991, 63, 887.

19. ‘Guidelines on Nuclear Magnetic Computerized Databases (Recommendations 1995)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1995, 67, 593.

20. ‘Instrumentation for the Spectral Dispersion and Isolation of Optical Radiations (Recommendations 1995)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1995, 67, 1725.

21. ‘Detection of Radiation (Recommendations 1995)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1995, 67, 1745.

22. ‘Laser-Based Molecular Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis: Laser Fundamentals (Recommendations 1995)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1995, 67, 1913.

23. ‘Symmetry, Selection Rules and Nomenclature Surface Spectroscopy (Recommendations 1996)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1996, 82, 457.

24. ‘Nomenclature, Symbols, Units, and their Usage in Spectrochemical Analysis – XVI. Laser-Based Molecular Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis – Luminescence (Recommendations 1997)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1997, 69, 1435.

25. ‘Nomenclature, Symbols, Units, and their Usage in Spectrochemical Analysis – XVII. Laser-Based Molecular Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis – Raman Scattering Processes (Recommendations 1997)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1997, 69, 1451.

26. ‘Recommendations for the Presentation of NMR Structures of Proteins and Nucleic Acids (Recommendations 1998)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1998, 70, 117.

27. ‘Nomenclature, Symbols, Units, and their Usage in Spectrochemical Analysis – XVI. Laser-Based Atomic Spectroscopy: A New Notation for Spectrochemical Processes (Recommendations 1997)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1998, 70, 517.

28. ‘NMR Nomenclature. Nuclear Spin Properties and Conventions for Chemical Shifts (Recommendations 2001)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2001, 73, 1795.

29. ‘Quantities, Terminology, and Symbols in Photothermal and Related Spectroscopies (Recommendations 2004)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2004, 76, 1083.

30. ‘Definitions of Terms Relating to Mass Spectrometry (IUPAC Recommendations 2013)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2013, 85, 1515.

 

 

VI. Macromolecular Chemistry

 1. ‘Stereochemical Definitions and Notations Relating to Polymers (Recommendations 1980)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1981, 53, 733.

 2. ‘Nomenclature of Regular Single-Strand Organic Polymers (Rules Approved 1975)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1974, 48, 373..

 3. ‘List of Standard Abbreviations (Symbols) for Synthetic Polymers and Polymer Materials (1974)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1974, 40, 473.

 4. ‘Basic Definitions of Terms Relating Polymers (1974)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1974, 40, 477.

 5. ‘Recommendations for Abbreviations of Terms Relating to Plastics and Elastomers’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1968, 18, 583.

 6. ‘Nomenclature for Regular Single-Strand and Quasi Single-Strand Inorganic and Coordination Polymers (Recommendations 1984)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1985, 57, 149.

 7. ‘Source-Base Nomenclature for Copolymers (Recommendations 1985)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1985, 57, 1427.

 8. ‘Use of Abbreviations for Names of Polymeric Substances (Recommendations 1986)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1987, 59, 691.

 9. ‘A Classification of Linear Single-Strand Polymers (Recommendations 1988)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1989, 61, 243.

10. ‘Definitions of Terms Relating Individual Macromolecules, their Assemblies, and Dilute Polymer Solutions (Recommendations 1988)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1989, 61, 211.

11. ‘Definitions of Terms Relating to Crystalline Polymers (Recommendations 1988)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1989, 61, 769.

12. ‘The Study of Microstructures Poly(vinyl alcohol) by NMR’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1990, 62, 2139.

13. ‘Nomenclature of Regular Double-Strand (Ladder or Spiro) Organic Polymers (Recommendations 1993)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1993, 65, 1561.

14. ‘Structure-Based Nomenclature for Irregular Single-Strand Organic Polymers (Recommendations 1994)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1994, 66, 873.

15. ‘Graphic Representations (Chemical Formulae) of Macromolecules (Recommendations 1994)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1994, 66, 2469.

16. ‘Basic Classification and Definitions of Polymerization Reactions (Recommendations 1994)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1994, 66, 2469.

17. ‘Terminology for Membranes and Membrane Processes (Recommendations 1996)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1996, 82, 1479.

18. ‘Definition of Terms Relating to the Non-ultimate Mechanical Properties of Polymers (Recommendations 1998)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1998, 70, 701.

19. ‘Definitions of Basic Terms Relating to Low-Molecular-Mass and Polymer Liquid Crystals (Recommendations 2001)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2001, 73, 845.

20. ‘Generic Source-Based Nomenclature for Polymers (Recommendations 2001)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2001, 73, 1511.

21. ‘Definitions of Basic Terms Relating to Polymer Liquid Crystals (Recommendations 2001)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2002, 74, 493.

22. ‘Definitions Relating to Stereochemically Asymmetric Polymerizations (Recommendations 2001)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2002, 74, 915.

23. ‘Nomenclature of Regular Single-Strand Organic Polymers (Recommendations 2002)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2002, 74, 1921.

24. ‘Errata to Generic Source-Based Nomenclature for Polymers (Recommendations 2001)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2002, 74, 2019.

25. ‘Definitions of Terms Relating to Reactions of Polymers and to Functional Polymeric Materials (Recommendations 2003)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2004, 76, 889.

26. ‘Definitions of Terms Related to Polymer Blends, Composites, and Multiphase Polymeric Materials (Recommendations 2004)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2004, 76, 1985.

27. ‘Structure-Based Nomenclature for Cyclic Organic Macromolecules (IUPAC Recommendations 2008)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2008, 80, 201.

28. ‘Glossary of Terms Related to Kinetics, Thermodynamics, and Mechanisms of Polymerization (IUPAC Recommendations 2008)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2008, 80, 2163.

29. ‘Glossary of Class Names of Polymers Based on Chemical Structure and Molecular Architecture (IUPAC Recommendations 2009)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2009, 81, 1131.

30. ‘Definitions of Terms Relating to Crystalline Polymers (IUPAC Recommendations 2011)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2011, 83, 1831.

31. ‘Terminology of Polymers and Polymerization Processes in Dispersed Systems (IUPAC Recommendations 2011)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2011, 83, 2229.

32. ‘Terminology for Biorelated Polymers and Applications (IUPAC Recommendations 2012)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2012, 84, 377.

33. ‘Terminology and Nomenclature for Macromolecular Rotaxanes and Pseudorotaxanes (IUPAC Recommendations 2012)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2012, 84, 2135.

34. ‘Terminology for Aggregation and Self-Assembly in Polymer Science (IUPAC Recommendations 2013)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2013, 85, 463.

35. ‘Glossary of Terms Relating to Thermal and Thermomechanical Properties of Polymers (IUPAC Recommendations 2013)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2013, 85, 1017.

 

 

VII. Miscellaneous

 1. ‘Use of Abbreviations in the Chemical Literature (Recommendations 1979)‘, Pure Appl. Chem. 1980, 52, 2229.

 2. ‘Glossary for Chemists of Terms Used in Biotechnology (Recommendations 1992)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1992, 64, 143.

 3. ‘Units for Use in Atmospheric Chemistry (Recommendations 1995)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 1995, 67, 1377.

 4. ‘Compendium of Chemical Terminology (IUPAC Recommendations)’, compiled by A. D. McNaught and A. Wilkinson, Blackwell Science, 1997.

 5. ‘Glossary of Terms Used in Medicinal Chemistry (Recommendations 1998)’, , Pure Appl. Chem. 1998, 70, 1129.

 6. Graphical Representation of Stereochemical Configuration (Recommendations 2006)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2006, 78, 1897.

 7. Graphical Representation Standards for Chemical Structure Diagrams (IUPAC Recommendations 2008)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2008, 80, 277.

 8. Glossary of Terms Used in Ecotoxicology (IUPAC Recommendations 2009)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2009, 81, 829.

 9. Glossary of Terms Related to Pharmaceutics (IUPAC Recommendations 2009)’, Pure Appl. Chem. . 2009, 81, 971.

10. Glossary of Terms Used in Biomolecular Screening (IUPAC Recommendations 2011)’, Pure Appl. Chem.m. 2011, 83, 1129.

11. Glossary of Terms Used in Medicinal Chemistry. Part II (IUPAC Recommendations 2013)’, Pure Appl. Chem. 2013, 85, 1725.

 

 


Appendix III.I. Some Symbols and Abbreviations Used by HCA

Designation

Symbol

Remarks

Amount-of-substance concentration   or ‘molarity’a)

m

in mol/dm3, e.g., 1m NaOH

Molalitya)

m

in mol/kg; e.g., 1 m HCl

Normalitya)

n

in equiv./dm3; e.g., 1n H2S

Percentage by mass

%

e.g., 15%

Percentage by volume

% (v/v)

e.g., 20% (v/v)

Melting point

m.p.

e.g., m.p. 157 – 158°

Boiling point

b.p.

e.g., b.p. 111 – 112°

Boiling point under a certain pressure

b.p./Torr

e.g., b.p. 65°/4 Torr

Freezing point

f.p.

e.g., f.p. 3°

Refractive index

n

e.g., nd  = 1.643

Relative density

d

e.g., d20  = 1.1811

Optical rotationb)

α

e.g., α  = 0.73 (l = 0.1, neat)

Specific optical rotationb)

[α]

e.g., [α]d  = 108 (c = 3.42, CHCl3)

Molecular optical rotationb)

[M]

e.g., [M] = 380 (c = 1.52, H2O)

Thin-layer chromatography

TLC

 

Gas-liquid chromatography

GLC

 

Liquid chromatography

LC

 

Column chromatography

CC

 

High-pressure (performance)

liquid chromatography

HPLC

 

Paper chromatography

PC

 

Ultraviolet

UV

 

Visible

VIS

 

Circular dichroism

CD

 

Optical rotatory dispersion

ORD

 

Infrared (absorption)

IR

 

Nuclear magnetic resonance of 1H

1H-NMR

 

Nuclear magnetic resonance of 13C

13C-NMR

 

Electron paramagnetic resonance

EPR

 

Electron spin resonance

ESR

 

Mass spectrum

MS

 

Photoelectron spectroscopy

PES

 

X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy

XPES, ESCA

 

Shoulder

sh

 

Broad

br.

 

Strong IR absorption

s

 

Medium IR absorption

m

 

Weak IR absorption

w

 

Singlet

s

 

Doublet

d

 

Triplet

t

 

Quadruplet

q

 

Quintuplet

quint.

 

Sextuplet

sext.

 

Septuplet

sept.

 

Multiplet

m

 

a)    For a comprehensive discussion on the usage of the terms ‘equivalent’ and ‘normal’, see Pure Appl. Chem. 1978, 50, 325.

b)    The symbol c is used in connection with the specific optical rotation [α]; it is defined as mass of substance (in g) in 100 ml of solution. The quantities l and d in [α] = 100 · α/l · c or [α] = α/l · d are given in dm and g/ml (kg/m3), respectively.


 

Appendix IV. Some Acceptable Non-SI Units

Physical quantity

Name of unit

Symbol of unit

Length

Ångström

Å

 

Bohr radius

ao

Volume

Liter

l, L

 

Milliliter

ml, mL

 

Microliter

µl, µL

Time

Minute

min

 

Hour

h

 

Day

d

Frequency

Hertz

Hz

 

Megahertz

MHz

Mass

Gram

g

 

Milligram

mg

 

Microgram

µg

Pressure

Bar

bar

 

Millibar

mbar

 

Torr

Torr

Energy

Electronvolt

eV

 

Hartree

Ha or Ea

Temperature

Degree Celsius

°C

Dipole moment

Debye

D

 

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